What is Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a tool for well-being.  The body becomes naturally weathered and off-track and the healing principles of Chinese Medicine can help to bring the body into balance.  It is with this simple understanding of life that Hope draws upon ancient, natural treatments of Chinese Medicine to address a wide variety of complex issues, including:

  • back and neck pain
  • sports related injuries
  • relief from insomnia, anxiety, depression
  • stress related illnesses. 

Acupuncture has been used as a therapeutic modality for more than 3000 years.  There are a wealth of anecdotal experiences documenting is clinical effectiveness for a variety of problems.  But it's only since the 1970's, as advances in understanding the physiology of pain developed, that scientists began to understand  the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture.  Over the last 45 years, the scientific and clinical medical communities have put forth a substantial of body of evidence to support the efficacy of acupuncture.

How Does It Work

Acupuncture traditionally was believed to work by maintaining and balancing the flow of Qi  or “vital energy” in the human body.  Qi is essentially an energetic concept that is postulated by Chinese philosophy as a tangible force that allows energy transfer, movement, growth, and development to occur. To maintain physical and mental health, the flow of Qi must stay fluid and in balance.  Blockage in the flow of Qi can cause imbalance and eventually manifest into disease.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, individuals can influence this balance of Qi internally, by analyzing the flow of Qi along defined pathways on the surface of the body in a set of channels called meridians. The meridians all are connected to each other and to all the internal organs in complex patterns. Treatment first involves first correctly identifying the internal and external imbalances.  Then, inserting needles into appropriate points along the meridians realigns Qi flow in the body and restores internal homeostasis.

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